Touring an OLD MINE + COWBOY Lunch! | Exploring Crowsnest Pass in ALBERTA, Canada

 Touring an OLD MINE + COWBOY Lunch! | Exploring Crowsnest Pass in ALBERTA, Canada

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so we are all checked in for our tour  we're doing the bellevue mine tour cheers guys i picked the right thing  here let me show you what we got this is basically a mountain that fell apart  and destroyed the town beneath it it was called   the town of frank and you can see it's been since  1903 and the nothing has grown it looks like it   happened yesterday yeah it's just surreal  walking here well hello hello everyone good   morning good morning good morning people today  we've got the team assembled we've got my dad   daniel sam in the back me hello and we are  going on our first little adventure here   in southern alberta canada as you may already  know my parents moved to this province a month ago   see you later southern ontario yeah so we  have a few adventures planned and today   we're going to be exploring around crow's  nest pass and we're going to be visiting   a few different communities going into an  old mine and yeah just learning a bit more   about the history the mining history of this  place so come along we'll have a good day i dermis okay guys so we are back in the car  because today is one of the windiest days   we have yet experience here in southern  alberta you wouldn't be able to hear us   if we were out there it's a good thing nobody  brought a hat huh yes yeah i did by the way but yeah we just finished visiting the famous  burmese tree which lived to be over 700 years   like it's a type of pine what kind of pine is it  who remembers a limber pine limber a limber pine   so it's a type of pine that really thrives in  this harsh windy climate that you find here in   this region and yeah it lived for seven centuries  until finally in the 1970s the pine needles fell   to the ground and they lost the battle against  time i lost the battle it stood dry like dead   for two more decades until the wind toppled it  over but now they've like propped it up again and   there's like anchors holding on to it no this  was like a landmark it was a a landmark that   it was the the entrance the uh uh  eastern entrance to the crow's nest pass   and this three marked where it actually the  past begins right so that's why it was it   was famous because it was like a like a beacon  there like people would uh you know know that   when the tree when they reach this tree they  reach the past yeah and we're talking about uh   not yesterday or the day before we are talking  about centuries ago yeah so in those days there   were no street names or markers what would you say  for orientation like yeah like uh like a marker   a landmark that everyone  would understand that's really of the crow's nest to go into british  columbia so okay today may look like   okay it's just a dead tree but if you go  back in time you know a few hundred years   it could have been something of  real importance back then you know   so okay we go to the next one we go to the  next one so there you have it guys that was   the most photographed tree in canada Burmis Tree  Burmis Tree beautiful history what's the park please go by there over there yeah next stop  we maybe drove 45 seconds it's the collieries   which we're gonna we're gonna learn all  about this is a new word for us a new term my oh my we are searching for a little reprieve  from the wind so we can tell you a little bit more   about this place but basically i learned a new  word today so collieries refers to the buildings   related with coal mining and there's a whole  bunch of them to visit here we're actually in a   provincial park and yeah you've got these historic  structures left over from the mining era that you   can visit also hardly anyone here there's only two  other people walking around exploring the place   so not very well known because we're here in  the middle of summer and we've basically got the   place to ourselves look at that already several  people from my village here had wrote me come   plenty verb so i work first on temple but i want  to go underground uh that's very real man verbs i   say to myself so i go underground first i take in  horses and we bring out coal then taking timbers   i was young it was good job then my friend joseph  fez he was nearly killed when his lamp make   explosion after that i worry so much cold dust in  there some nights i could not sleep for coughing   so i joined union maybe they will help us in there  so we're learning lots what have you learned today   i've learned tons so right now we're visiting  the manager's house of the hamilton family and   it's just fascinating it was a three level home  it had hardwood floors it was fully equipped like   it was absolutely spectacular when you look at  the photos and now it's just in ruins but to   think that such a beautiful home is now reduced  to rubble like this it just shows you that   even the the most fascinating structures  of your time may not last into the future   yeah this would have been a very very nice  house for the time they even had indoor   plumbing that says a lot three fireplaces so yes  the manager of the coal mine lived very very well   and today all that remains is basically the  the outside walls like four walls that's it   okay so here we are escaping the wind once  again a little corner here you have to   uh don't look at our hair because today is a crazy  hair day yeah here we are in uh what's left of   our coal mine this was called the uh colliery  it was a mine that was uh operational in the uh   mid to late 1800s it became very active when the  railway was finished you know the one that goes   all the way to british columbia so yeah this  is mostly where uh the immigration from europe   used to come to this area to work in these places  and new immigrants right working these mines this   one in particular was uh the only full own  canadian mine owned totally by canadians   uh finally went bankrupt and uh it's funny  because up there there is a sign that it says   if it is broken we can fix it and he talks  about how they had to solve problems uh on   on the plays they could not wait for parts to come  from far away don't forget we're talking about the   mid-1800s so if you needed a part to fix a machine  it could have taken a month if not a year so they   had to do everything here fix everything use uh  inventive and genius and they they got it going   and the pictures that you see here around  the walls well it says it all they it says   the whole story of these people that worked here  it's amazing with such a rudimentary and crude   machinery they could do so much but the mine  really flourished in the late 1800s when the   railway was built finally to british columbia  through the past that railway uh you know   to build the the section from calgary to vancouver  which is about 600 miles they say that it took   600 lives 600 people died building that stretch of  uh railway which was the most difficult to build   out of the whole the canadian pacific railway  line and uh in all to build the whole railway uh   system is estimated that about  four thousand people perished   in those days and a lot of the people were coming  from china they brought about a 15 000 chinese uh   mostly men to come and work on the tunnels and  digging and you know mid-1800s it was pretty crude   technology so when they were digging the  tunnels uh the explosions and stuff like   that is not what it is today safety was not a  concern back then life was expendable let's put   it that way so yeah they built the railway and  finally they were able to export the call from   here to different uh centers and uh well sadly  with technology and the pass of time this mine   went bankrupt so this is all we have left today  to show but uh it was built to take it and you   can see these walls it's all the stones and  mortar and uh it's it's is solid i mean it can   take a punch in this construction and the proof  is that it's still standing okay so we are now   heading to our next stop we're gonna be  driving over to the bellevue mine for our tour so sam what else did you want to tell us about  this park i wanted to mention that it has my   favorite price point it's free whoa and the other  really nice thing it has really nice washing   facilities so you can go and use the washroom  and you can visit at your own pace yeah there's   obviously no tour guides here so take as long as  you want to kind of thoroughly explore the grounds   we did just that and yeah it's a really  interesting place highly recommended two thumbs up beautiful all right so we are all checked in  for our tour we're doing the bellevue   mine tour and in terms of prices it is 25 for  adults 20 bucks if you're a senior like my dad   and yeah it's gonna be i believe a one hour tour  with 45 minutes spent underground in the mine   okay let's look for a quieter spot guys hang  on hang on we're also right by the highway so here we go in between two walls what else was i  going to tell you oh the temperature when you go   into the mine it's around zero to two degrees so  it is very cold and you have to dress accordingly   we brought winter clothes that we have in the  car so we're gonna get into those now pants leggings what's your shirt i have a winter jacket i  can't sit here i'm not gonna be cold for an hour   that's my worst nightmare building called the temple slip down okay so we are out of the mine we finished the  tour so it's time to give you a little update   because you can't actually film the tour  experience you know you have to come here   see it for yourself but we got a few clips  of just like what it looks like inside so   first of all we learned there's over  240 kilometers of tunnels down there   it is huge essentially we go all the way  from here to calgary yes which is far yeah   yeah that's a several hour drive and the mine  operated from 1920 1903 1903 till 1961 yeah they   removed 17 000 tons of coal and apparently there  is another 70 000 tons waiting out on the ground   for maybe one day yeah they used to supply the  the the railroad yeah the canada pacific exactly   yeah yeah and then they switched obviously to  a different fuel they switched to diesel easily   diesel and they didn't need any more coal  and the mine just wasn't profitable anymore   yeah the value of coal went down yeah and it's a  type of coal that they call it number two grade   so it's not the best of uh very brittle yeah  so but it was uh a good experience if you   have the chance to come and visit yeah don't  miss it because uh very well explained yes   you can really feel the conditions on how  these people used to work down there like uh   you feel sorry for yeah the most interesting  part for me was they tried to simulate the lack   of light you would have had as a co-worker yeah  and i mean you basically were in the dark and the   your light could go out and if that was if that  happened you were expected to just stay where you   were until someone discovered you not for anyone  claustrophobic no way that's for sure normally   and really cold down there like imagine working  there every day and it feels like winter like zero   degrees and you're stuck down there for your full  shift before i forget that you they had the the   clydesdale horses to help pull some of the carts  yes yeah they could apparently pull up to what   six cards was it yeah three tons of gold in each  card on rails okay they were on rails so but yeah   there was a nice uh stream running down the side  of the mine with the more i never seen crystal   clear water like that ever it was amazing no yeah  it was running really heavy and and constantly and   the water was just totally totally you know clear  yeah i mean it felt like there was nothing running   there you looked and it was hard to see the water  actually yeah the overall was a fascinating tour   approximately just under an hour 20 dollars for  seniors and kids 25 for adults reasonably priced   and um well worth it i mean it's our first time  to have ever done anything like this so uh yeah   i i think it's highly recommended yeah for sure  it was great it's a good piece of adventure yeah   and now i want to show you guys the the sculpture  of the coal miner right there and i just realized   it has a little bit of black because they were  mining for coal yeah that's the thing when we came   out of the mine i looked at it and i was like oh  it all makes sense and right below it there is a   commemorative plaque oh yeah people that die  here on uh on a fire an explosion explosion in   1910 1910 the strange thing is that you see some  names last names and they're the same like some   of them with an older age like that would be the  father and then the other one a younger age so   that would be a son a real tragedy family members  perish together yeah you know so yeah yeah so yeah   that was it that was the tour and now we're going  to take you to lunch yes let's go eat in the ring is   a dream in my heart yeah this is just climb to the top of a  mountain fly around the world all right summer boy time for beer yeah cheers  so they had a few different things on tap   we both decided to go for the rickard's red and  the best part about it it's ice cold that's cold on a summer's day you can't get better than that   and so we've decided to go for the special  burgers you and your dad ordered that   and basically it's it's a it's a normal burger and  then it has the addition of pulled pork and then i   got something really interesting called the frank  slide which is named after the mountain slide   they've had here and apparently that's going to  have regular fries onions sweet potato fries ribs   and two special ingredients at the chef's  discretion so i'm pumped for that and apparently   i was challenged to be able to finish this from  from the server so it's going to be big we're   going to eat meal hope we brought our appetites  big meal for the big boy start digging again that's good stuff guys i picked the right thing  here let me show you what we got   a side of onion rings look at that we've got  the sweet potato fries deep fried jalapenos   jalapenos ribs try something try something i  tried this one i'm gonna oh this is so good i've got a smoky peppery toast garlicky  too very garlicky and then we also have don't choke there don't die  don't die don't die on this   i deep fried uh tempura and spring rolls with  five different sauces yeah i ain't gonna stop it   you're losing your voice i ain't gonna  starve over here i'm but i'm losing my voice not available all right guys so it's kind of windy here i  hope you can hear me okay but we have arrived   at our next stop today which is the frank slide  and i'm just gonna show you that because i have   it behind my shoulder over there right there but  yeah this is basically a mountain that fell apart   and destroyed the town beneath it it was called  the town of frank it had about 600 inhabitants   and about 100 of those perished in the accident  thankfully the whole town wasn't in the path of   the slide so parts of it were spared but yeah now  you just have this valley of giant boulders of   rock like it's crazy it kind of looks like a like  a lunar landscape it just it looks out of this   world so we have my dad here we're struggling with  the wind yeah what a struggle but this is southern   alberta the wind is not helping no but uh yeah the  accident happened in 1903 and there are a couple   of versions about it well why did it happen one  says that because coal mining was allowed to be exploited in the in the mountain there is a  seam of coal running through the mountain and   some people said that uh and some specialists  said that that was a contributing factor of the   mountain collapsing other people said no that had  nothing to do with it that it was a matter of uh   you know like uh hundreds of years of freezing  rain and uh the rain getting into the mountain   and freezing and you know like creating cracks  and expanding and that was a factor why why it   happened they're all debating about it i guess  we'll never know and you can see it's been since   1903 and the uh nothing has grown it looks like it  happened yesterday it uh it is in the same state wow it get windy up here other than opening  the road and the railway track for the for   the train to be able to keep on going the  rest remains like the day that uh it happened   so very interesting huh how uh a whole  mountain like that could collapse it's amazing   so aside from the lookout we just showed you  you also have the frank interpretive center   where you can watch a movie about the frank  slide how that all unfolded and the stories   of the survivors and things like that but  we're not allowed to film the video um   so instead we're going to show you some of  the trails that you can do from this very spot   so this is where we are right here super  close to the border with bc croziness pass   frank slide interpretive are we center  close to bc we're super close yeah   and then we've got a trail marker here  there's a whole bunch of trails going off   in different directions and you can enjoy  a hike and also get to see the slide from   a few different vantage points so lots to choose  from we're probably only going to do part of one   to give you a feel for it after that  meal i don't think we'll be able to walk   very very far i feel like we're in  need of a siesta but yeah here we are it feels like what sam it feels pretty historic  oh prehistoric like a land before time i'm waiting   for the t-rex to just appear from behind a random  rock and kind of bite my head off sort of like   my slightly morbid huh you know the landscape  really does look out of this world it's just crazy   yeah it's just surreal walking  here the giant sizes of the rocks   and the way they're all scattered it's  obviously really tragic what happened um   my honest thoughts are that this this area  looks prehistoric like this looks like something   it looks like a different planet it really  does like i've never seen a landscape like this   of just rock but at the same time you really  feel for what happened to the community all right guys so we are all back in the car  we wrapped up a really fun day of adventuring   here in southern alberta canada and this is  where we're gonna say goodbye because we're   heading home now we're tired okay audrey's  driving driving we had a couple of brews   so we don't drive we got a new designated  driver here hello she only had a iced tea so yeah if you like the video don't forget to  put a like subscribe subscribe your friends   your family members and the channel will keep  on growing and there is a lot a lot of more   interesting things happening so yeah thanks thank  you thank you for the promo one quick thing to   say um this just shows what you can explore in  your own backyard this is our new backyard we're   exploring and what a fantastic day so adventure  doesn't need to be in a far off corner of the   world it can be nearby your house yes keep that  in mind too and we have more local trips coming   up around alberta all summer long we're going to  be exploring so stay tuned and we'll see you soon   myself

2022-08-28 21:15

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